2019 SNAP-Ed Program Development Team Meeting

2019-2020 Program Development Team Members.  Not all team members were present for the photo.

 

Land-Grant University System SNAP-Ed Program Development Team  Annual Work Meeting Report: Action Items and Accomplishments April 16-18, 2019, Alexandria, VA

The Land-Grant University SNAP-Ed Program Development Team (PDT) is action-oriented, proactive, and focused on long-term projects. This 17-person team represents all Extension regions and is comprised of family and consumer science program leaders and other university administrators, SNAP-Ed program coordinators, an office manager from the Land-Grant University (LGU) System, and a federal partner from the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), U.S. Department of Agriculture.  In 2019, an EFNEP Coordinator was added to the team to help facilitate coordination among SNAP-Ed, EFNEP, and other Land-Grant University extension low-income nutrition education programs.  A second Family and Consumer Sciences Administrator was added to the Executive Committee to share volunteer leadership responsibilities.  The team conducts monthly conference calls, subcommittee work, and an annual face-to-face meeting to improve the consistency and effectiveness of Extension SNAP-Ed programming to address national health and nutrition-related problems facing low-income populations in the context of Extension’s broader low-income nutrition education portfolio.

At its annual meeting in April, the PDT reviewed progress, refined and updated its strategic plan implementation, and developed key action steps for the upcoming year.  Specific deliverables were identified, building upon past efforts.  These included:

  • Providing training to support SNAP-Ed leaders in educating legislators and stakeholders;
  • Developing and disseminating onboarding resources to help new SNAP-Ed leaders have a successful start and other resources to strengthen programming across the LGUs;
  • Improving coordination, complementary efforts, and synergy across the LGUs and with additional partners to maximize efficiency and avoid duplication;
  • Preparing a SNAP-Ed LGU National Report on comprehensive approaches and impacts; and
  • Fostering communication among LGUs and with other implementing agencies and stakeholders.

The PDT’s ongoing goals are to support programming, professional development, and partner engagement in ways that will best serve the SNAP-Ed population.  The updated strategic plan is being finalized and will be shared shortly with Extension Directors/Administrators, FCS Leaders, and SNAP-Ed Directors/Coordinators.

Highlights of the last year include:

  • Legislative Education. A primary focus for the year was to ensure that Extension leadership and others had current, relevant, and accurate information.  The PDT gathered data, developed content for stakeholders, created a SNAP-Ed brochure, and responded to requests from ECOP.
  • Strengthening Program and Developing Colleagues. A second priority was the development of program staff.  Resources were created for a SNAP-Ed 101 primer that is under development.  PDT members also provided training, mentored new coordinators, and addressed questions from colleagues.  They held a web-retreat for LGU-Extension SNAP-Ed Directors to discuss hot topics and share best practices. 
  • Building and Sustaining Critical Partnerships. The PDT manned a display at the National SNAP Directors’ Annual Meeting.  Several PDT members also served as liaisons with Association of SNAP Nutrition Education Administrators (ASNNA) committees to ensure that PDT efforts aligned with priorities of other implementing agencies.  Resources were developed for strengthening interactions with State agencies.  PDT members met with USDA FNS contacts to consider how to support agency priorities. 
  • Enhancing Communication and Shared Understanding. PDT members facilitated increased calls and more consistent communication within and across extension regions. PDT developed resources are available at https://community-nutrition-education.extension.org, the community nutrition page on the eXtension website.  Program impact reports from 28 states and the District of Columbia for the past year have also been posted. This “community,” currently at 233 members, continues to grow.

 

Members of the LGU SNAP-Ed Program Development Team for 2019-2020

North Central Region

  • Christine Hradek, SNAP-Ed and EFNEP Coordinator, Iowa State University
  • Jennifer McCaffrey, Assistant Dean, Family and Consumer Sciences, University of Illinois (new)
  • Lisa Ross, Program Manager, EFNEP and SNAP-Ed, Kansas State University (new)

 

Northeast Region

  • Elise Gurgevich, SNAP-Ed and EFNEP Coordinator, Penn State University
  • Joan Paddock, EFNEP Coordinator, Cornell University (new)

 

Southern Region

  • Sylvia Byrd, Project Director, Office of Nutrition Education, Mississippi State University (new)
  • Candance (Candy) Gabel, State Coordinator, Community Nutrition Education Program, Oklahoma State University
  • Lorelei Jones, EFNEP Coordinator, North Carolina State University (new)
  • Andrea Morris, Health and Nutrition Specialist/Program Manager EFNEP and SNAP-Ed, Alabama A&M University; 1890 representative
  • Renda Nelson, Better Living for Texans State Program Director, Texas A&M University

 

Western Region

  • Heidi LeBlanc, SNAP-Ed Director, Utah State University (new)
  • Donna Sauter, ICAN Director (SNAP-Ed & EFNEP), New Mexico State University

 

Executive Committee

  • Angie Abbott, Assistant Dean and Associate Director, Health and Human Sciences Extension, Purdue University (new)
  • Laura Stephenson, Assistant Dean, Family and Consumer Sciences, University of Tennessee Extension
  • Jill Thorngren, Dean, College of Education and Human Sciences, South Dakota State University
  • Sandra Jensen, Office Manager SNAP-Ed through the LGU System, South Dakota State University
  • Helen Chipman, National Program Leader Food & Nutrition Education, NIFA/USDA

 

Special Projects (new)

  • Lauren Sweeney, SNAP-Ed Program Coordinator, Family, Youth and Community Services, University of Florida
  • Sally Bowman, Program Leader SNAP-Ed & EFNEP, Oregon State University (consultant)

 

Rotating Off – April 2019

  • Pat Bebo, Assistant Director, Family & Consumer Sciences Extension, The Ohio State University
  • Sally Bowman, Program Leader SNAP-Ed & EFNEP, Oregon State University
  • Patsy Ezell, Assistant Director FCS, University of Maryland
  • Megan Ness Ditterick, EFNEP/FNP Coordinator, North Dakota State University
  • Karla Shelnutt, Associate Professor and Extension Nutrition Specialist, University of Florida
  • Lisa Sullivan-Werner, FNP and EFNEP Leader, University of Massachusetts

 

2018 SNAP-Ed Program Development Team Meeting

2018 SNAP-Ed PDT Team Picture
2018 Program Development Team Members.  Not all team members were present for the photo.

Land-Grant University System SNAP-Ed Program Development Team
Report of Accomplishments and Action Items
Annual Work Meeting – April 10-12, 2018, Alexandria, VA

The Land-Grant University SNAP-Ed Program Development Team (PDT) met in Alexandria, Virginia to review progress, refine strategic plan implementation, and develop key action steps for the upcoming year.  This 15-person team represents all Extension regions and is comprised of family and consumer science program leaders and other university administrators, SNAP-Ed program coordinators, an office manager from the Land-Grant University (LGU) System, and a federal partner from the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA), U.S. Department of Agriculture.  The team conducts bimonthly conference calls, subcommittee work, and an annual face-to-face meeting to improve the consistency and effectiveness of Extension SNAP-Ed programming to address national health and nutrition-related problems facing low-income populations in the context of Extension’s broader low-income nutrition education portfolio.

Highlights of the last year and work meeting plans for upcoming year include:

  • Evaluation and Reporting. The most recent LGU SNAP-Ed Report, Executive Summary, and two-page Infographic, based on FY 2015 data, was shared with state agency partners at the National SNAP Directors’ Meeting. Plans were made to assemble an updated report using 2018 data to show the effects of Extension’s implementation of SNAP-Ed across the nation.  The PDT also plans to submit a proposal on Extension SNAP-Ed programming for the next National SNAP Directors’ meeting.
  • Collaboration for Shared Understanding.  The PDT manned a display at the National SNAP Directors’ meeting.  One PDT member served as a liaison to the Association of SNAP Nutrition Education Administrators (ASNNA) evaluation team to ensure that PDT efforts aligned with partner implementing agencies.  Toolkit resources are in final development for Extension SNAP-Ed coordinators to support state agency relationships, leverage partner relationships, and internally communicate the Extension SNAP-Ed mission and outreach.  Multiple resources are planned for dissemination in next few months.
  • Communication.  The PDT prepared Monday Minute submissions for Extension directors and administrators and reported on regional SNAP-Ed coordinator calls to keep LGUs informed of SNAP-Ed developments and PDT contributions.  They also partnered with the eXtension.org Community Nutrition Education Community of Practice to post yearly stakeholder reports, SNAP-Ed PDT documents, and LGU successes.  PDT Co-Chair, Laura Stephenson, shared highlights of PDT efforts with FCS leaders and ECOP leadership.  She and other team members worked with ECOP leadership to provide data and success examples in response to legislative inquiries regarding SNAP-Ed’s reach and effectiveness.  This year, the PDT will hold monthly calls and increase communications with colleagues, Extension leadership, and partners given the current level of interest and activity surrounding SNAP-Ed.
  • Professional Development and Cross Training.  PDT members provided leadership and dissemination support for on-line PSE training and development through collaboration with Regional Nutrition Education Centers of Excellence (RNECE). Technical assistance training for SNAP-Ed coordinators and specific training for new coordinators are planned for the current year via web-based technology. Another focus of PDT efforts will be the updating and further development of core competencies for staff across multiple areas of responsibility in support of nutrition education for limited resource individuals.
  • Educating Policy Makers.  PDT members provided collective Extension SNAP-Ed data upon request of ECOP leadership. Resources are in final stages of development to explain legislative processes for bill reauthorization to aid in understanding the federal nutrition education program and funding pathway. These resources will be disseminated in April.
  • Strategic Planning.  The PDT strategic plan focused efforts on: 1. Strengthening LGU and state agency relationships; 2. Keeping abreast of the current policy climate; 3. Enhancing internal communication among LGUs; and 4. Building shared expertise across LGUs.  This strategic plan continues to guide PDT activities and deliverables.  Specific deliverables and initial timelines and actions steps for each focus area were finalized for the current year.

Throughout the year, the PDT purposefully promoted the strength and capacity of Extension outreach efforts to efficiently and effectively develop, deliver, and evaluate multi-level educational approaches to positively impact the health and well-being of limited resource individuals. Additionally, PDT members focused on mentoring colleagues, building and sustaining critical partnerships with other implementing agencies, and promoting the importance of a nationwide system of nutrition education and evaluation expertise through the LGU System.

Members of the LGU SNAP-Ed Program Development Team for 2018-2019

North Central Region

Pat Bebo, Asst. Director, Family & Consumer Sciences Extension, The Ohio State University (term ended; will serve 1 year as ad hoc representative)

Candance (Candy) Gabel, State Coordinator – Director, Nutrition and Health Ed., University of Missouri (new)

Christine Hradek, SNAP-Ed and EFNEP Coordinator, Iowa State University

Megan Ness Ditterick, EFNEP/FNP Coordinator, North Dakota State University

Northeast Region

Patsy Ezell, Assistant Director FCS, University of Maryland

Lisa Sullivan-Werner, FNP and EFNEP Leader, University of Massachusetts

Elise Gurgevich, SNAP-Ed and EFNEP Coordinator, Penn State University (new)

Southern Region

Karla Shelnutt, Associate Professor and Extension Nutrition Specialist, University of Florida

Michelle Vineyard, Extension Specialist TNCEP, University of Tennessee (retired mid-year)

Renda Nelson, Better Living for Texans State Program Director, Texas A&M University

Ivy Murphy, SNAP-Ed Coordinator, North Carolina A&T University (served partial year); 1890 representative

Andrea Morris, Health and Nutrition Specialist/Program Manager EFNEP and SNAP-Ed, Alabama A&M University (new); 1890 representative

Western Region

Donna Sauter, ICAN Director (SNAP-Ed & EFNEP), New Mexico State University

Sally Bowman, Program Leader SNAP-Ed & EFNEP, Oregon State University

Executive Committee

Laura Stephenson, Assistant Dean, Family and Consumer Sciences, University of Tennessee Extension

Jill Thorngren, Dean, College of Education and Human Sciences, South Dakota State University

Sandra Jensen, Office Manager SNAP-Ed through the LGU System, South Dakota State University

Helen Chipman, National Program Leader Food & Nutrition Education, NIFA/USDA

To download a copy of the highlights of the meetings, visit 2018 PDT Committee Meeting Highlights.

2017 SNAP-Ed Program Development Team Meeting

2017 PDT committee

2017 Program Development Team Members.  Not all team members were present for the photo.

The Land-Grant University SNAP-Ed Program Development Team (PDT) met in Alexandria, Virginia to review progress, implement a strategic planning process, and develop key action steps for the upcoming year. This 16-person team represents all Extension regions and is comprised of Family and Consumer Science Program Leaders and other university administrators, SNAP-Ed Program Coordinators, and an office manager from the Land-Grant University (LGU) System, and a federal partner from NIFA. The PDT team meets through bimonthly conference calls, subcommittee work, and an annual face-to- face meeting to improve the consistency and effectiveness of SNAP-Ed programming through the LGU System in addressing national health and nutrition-related problems facing low-income populations.

Highlights of the meeting and the last year include:

  • Evaluation and Reporting. Publication and dissemination of the SNAP-Ed FY 2015 Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education through the Land-Grant University System Report, Executive Summary, and two-page Infographic.  LGUs, USDA Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), and NIFA were provided hard copies and notified of electronic versions. Members of ASNNA, a national association of SNAP-Ed implementing agencies, were notified of electronic version availability.
  • Collaboration for Shared Understanding. The PDT provided a display at the National SNAP Directors’ meeting. Two PDT members served in ASNNA leadership roles to ensure that LGU programs were at the table for implementing agency discussions.
  • Communication. The PDT prepared Monday Minute submissions to keep LGUs informed of SNAP-Ed developments and PDT contributions. They also partnered with the eXtension.org Community Nutrition Education Community of Practice to post yearly stakeholder reports, SNAP-Ed PDT documents, and LGU successes. PDT Co-Chair, Paula Peters shared highlights of PDT efforts at FCS Leader and ECOP meetings. She also drafted a document to articulate differences between EFNEP and SNAP-Ed at the request of ECOP leadership and provided feedback on LGU SNAP-Ed leadership expertise.
  • Professional Development and Cross Training. PDT members facilitated participation in SNAP-Ed PSE competency training and engaged Rural Development Centers to provide a webinar on the potential intersect of SNAP-Ed and Community Development. PDT members also provided leadership and collaboration for PSE training and development through collaboration with Regional Nutrition Education Centers of Excellence (RNECE).
  • Educating Policy Makers. PDT member, Angie Abbott was invited to attend a House Ag Committee call, following which, former PDT member, Jo Britt-Rankin was invited to provide oral testimony and current PDT member, Pat Bebo submitted written testimony on LGU SNAP-Ed impacts.
  • Strategic Planning. In February, an Ad Hoc Committee met to review LGU SNAP-Ed stakeholder input on current needs of LGU SNAP-Ed implementers, identified common themes, and considered what could be addressed through PDT efforts. This committee developed an overview of five issues as a precursor to strategic planning development by the full PDT. The issues identified included: 1. Integration of policy, systems and environmental (PSE) approaches, direct education and social marketing; 2. Strengthening LGU and state agency relationships; 3. Keeping abreast of the current policy climate; 4. Enhancing internal communication among LGUs; and 5. Building shared expertise across LGUs. In April, PDT members developed a 2017-2020 strategic plan based upon the Ad Hoc Committee recommendations, to guide PDT activities and deliverables over the next three years. Goals, action steps and members’ tasks were developed for 2017-2018.

Throughout the year, the PDT has played a critical role in educating about nutrition education for low-income families. Members have directly and indirectly communicated the importance of SNAP-Ed to decision makers, have provided formal or informal mentoring to colleagues in the LGU System and have addressed critical programmatic needs the LGU System faced during changes created by new legislation, regulations, and guidance. Thank you to members who have completed their service on the PDT: Paula Peters (Kansas State University), Jamie Dollahite (Cornell University), Kathleen Manenica (Washington State University), Angie Abbott (Purdue University), Mindy Meuli (University of Wyoming), De’Shoin York-Friendship (Southern University)

Members of the LGU SNAP-Ed Program Development Team for 2017-2018

North Central Region

Christine Hradek, SNAP-Ed and EFNEP Coordinator, Iowa State University

Megan Ness, EFNEP/FNP Coordinator, North Dakota State University

Pat Bebo, Interim Assistant Director FCS, Ohio State University

Northeast Region

Patsy Ezell, Assistant Director FCS, University of Maryland

Lisa Sullivan-Werner, FNP and EFNEP Leader, University of Massachusetts

Southern Region

Karla Shelnutt, Associate Professor & Extension Nutrition Specialist, University of Florida

Ivy Murphy (1890 rep), Try Healthy SNAP-Ed Project Coordinator, North Carolina A & T State University

Michelle Vineyard, Extension Specialist TNCEP, University of Tennessee

Renda Nelson, Better Living for Texans State Program Director, Texas A&M University

Western Region

Adrian Kohrt, FNP Coordinator, University of Alaska

Donna Sauter, ICAN Director (SNAP-Ed & EFNEP), New Mexico State University

Sally Bowman, Program Leader SNAP-Ed &  EFNEP, Oregon State University

Executive Committee

Laura Stephenson, Assistant Dean, University of Tennessee Extension

C.Y. Wang, Associate Dean & Associate Director, South Dakota State University

Sandra Jensen, Office Manager SNAP-Ed through the LGU System, South Dakota State University

Helen Chipman, National Program Leader Food & Nutrition Education, NIFA/USDA

To download a copy of the highlights of the meetings, visit  2017 PDT Committee Meeting Highlights.

2016 SNAP-Ed Program Development Team Meeting

2016 PDT Team photo
2016 Program Development Team Members.  Not all team members were present for the photo.

The Land-Grant University SNAP-Ed Program Development Team (PDT) includes Family and Consumer Science Program Leaders and other university administrators, SNAP-Ed Program Coordinators, an office manager, and a NIFA representative who are committed to improving the consistency and effectiveness of SNAP-Ed programming through the LGU System in addressing national health and nutrition-related problems facing low-income populations.  This 16-person team, which represents all Extension regions, meets bimonthly by conference calls, subcommittee, and in an annual face-to-face working meeting.  The team met recently in Alexandria, Virginia to review progress and plan for the upcoming year.  

Highlights of the meeting and the last year include:

  • We offered Policy, Systems, and Environmental (PSE) change development and technical assistance by facilitating LGU involvement in webinars on PSE implementation and coordinating with the SNAP and EFNEP Regional Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention (RNECE) Centers of Excellence to increase dissemination and utilization of PSE training and other resources that are currently under development.  We will continue to facilitate training and learning opportunities and information dissemination that comes through these Centers.
  • We hosted a joint webinar with Community Development colleagues and have developed a plan to further strengthen SNAP-Ed and Community Development collaborations.
  • We have maintained the Community Nutrition Education Community of Practice in eXtension, through which we have offered information on activities of SNAP-Ed programs, posted stakeholders’ reports, posted webinar recordings, and posted updates from RNECE grantees.
  • We developed the template and contracted with TEConomy to produce the fourth LGU SNAP-ED Report.  We had a 79% response rate.  Past national reports have positioned us well.  This report which is nearing completion, will illustrate how the LGUs have adapted to changes resulting from the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act (HHFKA) of 2010, at which time SNAP-Ed transitioned to a competitive grant and the program focus shifted to nutrition education and obesity prevention using comprehensive and multi-level interventions for change.  This report is expected to propel Extension, once again, to be seen as effective leaders of SNAP-Ed.   We have a plan for dissemination of the report to key stakeholders, and discussing with program colleagues to guide future programming.
  • We have identified the need to highlight partnerships, programs, and initiatives where CES and public  health have high impact programs (for example, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation winners for Culture of Health).  We will share these highlights within the LGU system so that others can learn from them.
  • We met with Michele Rodgers, ECOP Chair, and with a representative from Cornerstone, who identified data points that they need to speak accurately and effectively about SNAP-Ed through the LGU System in preparation for legislative discussions.  We have developed a survey that will be released shortly to collect the desired information.  Concurrently, in this short survey we will ask universities to self-identify strengths around emerging issues, in order to create an expertise mapping resource for universities to draw upon for mentoring and coaching when faced with similar challenges.
  • We have committed to providing ECOP examples and to working with the land-grant universities to better reflect SNAP-Ed’s role in Extension’s Health and Wellness Framework.
  • Revisions have been made to the manuscript we submitted to the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior that defines terminology used in SNAP-Ed to help develop common language that is understood across all implementing agencies.  We are waiting for further word from the Editor.
  • We presented at the annual national SNAP Directors’ meeting and shared information about SNAP-Ed through LGUs – through a booth and two presentations on the program.  We have plans to continue presenting at the SNAP Directors’ meeting again next year.
  • We submitted comments to FNS on SNAP-Ed Guidance and the Education and Administrative Reporting System (EARS) as invited, and have worked actively with other entities on the further development of evaluation measures for SNAP-Ed.
  • We renewed our commitment to keeping Extension Directors/Administrators informed through monthly contributions to the “Monday Minute”, a presentation at ECOP in July, and ongoing dialogue with FCS Leaders and Program Coordinators through regional meetings.
  • We will also continue to encourage and facilitate regional dialogue on SNAP-Ed, for more consistency in programming and resolution of concerns within and across regions.
  • We set a new priority for 2017 to facilitate stronger university and state agency SNAP-Ed relationships, which may result in a white paper, mentoring, coaching, or other actions.

In addition to these specific actions that have been accomplished, are underway, or are planned, the PDT continues to play a critical role in advocating for nutrition education for low income families.  Members have directly and indirectly communicated importance of federal funding to decision makers, have provided formal or informal mentoring to colleagues in the LGU system and have addressed critical programmatic needs the LGU system faced during changes created by new legislation, regulations, and guidance.

To download a copy of the highlights of the meetings, visit 2016 PDT Committee Meeting Highlights.

SNAP-Ed Program Development Team Annual Meeting

 

The SNAP-Ed PDT held their annual face to face meeting in Washington, DC recently. Their time together was spent discussing ways to recognize, support, and expand the work that Land Grant University SNAP-Ed programs do with regard to policy, system, and environmental (PSE) impacts.  Below is a summary of the meeting:

The SNAP-Ed Program Development Team, representing all Extension Regions, recently met in Arlington, VA to share and plan for the upcoming year.  Highlights of the meeting and the last year:

  • We recognized that a great deal of policy, system and environmental (PSE) work is happening in Extension now, but not all states have the understanding or skills needed to engage in this work.  We are offering PSE professional development and technical assistance over the next few months to aid our colleagues in Extension.
  • We prepared a template to gather data for a new report from Land-Grant Universities about their SNAP-Ed outcomes, both direct education and PSE work.  Past national reports have positioned us well.  The next report for SNAP-Ed through the Land-Grant University System, which will include data for 2015, will be the first to reflect programming since the Healthy Hunger Free Kids Act (HHFKA) of 2010 transitioned SNAP-Ed to a competitive grant and emphasized nutrition education and obesity prevention.  This national report will propel Extension, once again, to be seen as effective leaders in SNAP-Education.  The previous report from 2010 can be accessed online…. http://nifa.usda.gov/resource/snap-ed-2010-national-lgu-report.
  • We presented a webinar to highlight the report: Aligning and Elevating University-Based Low-Income Nutrition Education through the Land-Grant University Cooperative Extension System, which was prepared as part of a project funded by NIFA’s Institute of Food Safety and Nutrition at the request of two former ECOP Chairs, Douglas Steele and Daryl Buchholz, to facilitate increased visibility and improved alignment of EFNEP and SNAP-Ed through the Land-Grant University Cooperative Extension System.
  • We developed a PowerPoint to assist SNAP-Ed coordinators in communication with lawmakers.
  • We surveyed and shared findings on university responses to changes in grant processes, funding, and agency relationships resulting from HHFKA.
  • We presented at the annual national SNAP Directors meeting and shared information about SNAP-Ed through LGUs.
  • We submitted a manuscript to the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior that defines terminology used in SNAP-Ed to help develop common language that is understood across all implementing agencies.  The manuscript has been reviewed and accepted, subject to revisions.
  • We met separately with NIFA and with ECOP and Cornerstone.  They helped us understand the needs for strengthening communication and programmatic understanding among SNAP-Ed Coordinators, administrators, and the PDT.
  • Team members provided input into the FNS SNAP-Ed Guidance, some of which was included in that document.
  • We acknowledged the relationship of the PDT with the Regional Nutrition Education Centers of Excellence.  Three PDT members are from host institutions for the centers and one is a center PI.

The PDT committed to the following action items for the next year:

  • Hold webinars on:
  • Policy, System and Environmental Approaches to SNAP-Ed
  • Measuring Collective Impact
  • Community Development Competencies and How They Apply to SNAP-Ed

  • Refine and distribute a list of talking points on the value of the LGU SNAP-Ed program.
  • Produce the fourth National LGU SNAP-Ed Report of Impacts using the template we recently prepared.
  • Communicate with Extension Directors/Administrators through a monthly insertion to the “Monday Minute”.  Be available to meet with ECOP at least annually.
  • Explore ways for the PDT to be involved with the implementation of Cooperative Extension’s Framework for Health and Wellness.